From The Neolithic To The Sea: A Journey From The Past To The Present
St. Marys Hospital
Statistics
Category
County
Coordinates
Grid
Condition
Age
Admission
Hospital
Northhumberland
-
-
Demolished
1914
-
  • History
  • Gallery
  • Gallery
  • Gallery
  • Gallery
  • Gallery
  • Gallery
  • Gallery
  • Gallery
  • Gallery
  • Gallery
St Marys Hospital is an mental asylum in the small village of Stannington, Northhumberland. Originally know as The Gateshead or Stannington Mental Hospital.

Designed by the architects George Hine and Carter-Pegg, St Marys has the capacity for 500 people. It is the last building project to be completed by George Hine.

Styled by George Hine, in red brick with yellow banding, concrete lintels and grey roof slate boasting a great hall, admin block, isolation and general wards as well as six pairs of married staff cottages and farmland enforcing the self contained nature of the site.

St Marys was requisitioned by the military almost as soon as it opened because of World War One. Around 1927 a nurses home was built and the isolation wards were converted into a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients. Other improvements and changes were made in the 1930's.

During World War Two the hospital was again requisitioned with a few changes made including a hutted emergency medical services building to the north of the main building. After the war with the formation of the National Health Service the hospital changed its name to St Mary's and the hutted emergency hospital was converted to house mental defectives. A staff training school and more buildings providing social and occupational therapy were built.

Cost cutting, resettlement and closures led to loss of services and ancillary buildings being closed in the late 1980's and by 1995 the hospital was closed with facilities moving to Bensham general hospital.

Today the building sits empty, disused and almost abandoned. Staff cottages and the stewards residence are now in private hands. The boiler house chimney has collapsed due to structural failure. All original buildings have been given grade II listings.