From The Neolithic To The Sea: A Journey From The Past To The Present
Annesley Colliery
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Category
County
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Condition
Age
Admission
Mine
Nottinghamshire
53° 4' 27.8" N 1° 13' 46.1"  W
SK5172053195
Demolished
1864
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Annesley Colliery is located just outside the villages of Annesley and Newstead in Nottinghamshire.

The mine was originally sunk in 1864 into the Top Hard seam by the Worswick family, who were originally from Leicestershire.

The Top Hard seam was mined for at least 50 years until the shaft was extended down to the Deep Hard seam in 1914. This was worked until 1950. In 1924 the colliery was bought by the New Hucknall Colliery Company who invested much needed capital into the mine. At some point during this time the Deep Soft seam was opened and worked until 1983.

In January 1st 1947 Annesley became part of the National Coal Board and in 1967 became part of the South Nottinghamshire area of the N.C.B.

The pit featured in two TV documentaries in the early 1970’s, namely Panorama and World in Action.

The Tupton seam was reached in 1978. By 1981 coal turning up the Annesley shafts ceased with all the coal being diverted underground to the surface at Bentinck Colliery.

With privatisation the pit was sold to Coal Investments PLC, and then Midland Mining Ltd. Annesley became part of the Annesley, Bentinck, Newstead Complex in 1985 and in the same year part of the newly formed Nottinghamshire area of British Coal. Major reconstruction took place in 1986 with all the working in the Tupton and Deep Hard seams abandoned, with all future mining operations based in the Thick Black Shale.

In 1988 the Colliery officially became the Annesley/Bentinck Mine. When Linby ceased production in March 1988 it left Annesley the last pit in the Leen Valley.

In January 1999, it was announced that Midlands Mining PLC was intending to close Annesley-Bentinck colliery by the end of the year, due to geological problems and adverse market conditions despite claims of 20 years of reserves available in the Blackshale and Lowmain seams. The last shift was completed Friday 28th January 2000.